I really like panoramas. There is something very appealing regarding their shape. It’s most likely because we have seen the planet more during these dimensions compared to near square format of normal film/sensor frames. It could also explain the upsurge within the recognition of widescreen TVs!

Panoramas possess a status to be difficult to take. You will find dedicated panorama cameras available but unless of course you have a minimum of a 1000 dollars to spare, you most likely can not afford one! However, you may take panoramas with any type of camera.

All a panorama is, is really a sequence of images in which you turn slightly for every different frame. Several years ago, before Computers and so forth of Illustrator were around, you’d bring your prints (there wasn’t much reason for shooting panoramas on slide film, for apparent reasons), lay them on a table and position on them one another where they overlapped. A little bit of sticky tape held them together. [Like a side note, this method was utilized by NASA to develop mosaic images of the planets and satellites their spaceprobes visited, up up until the late ’70s/early 80s when computers were introduced to help make the process less laborious].

Since Computers and image manipulation packages are simple to come across, high-quality panoramas is now able to produced by anybody. If you are shooting slide or negative film, you will have to have your images scanned before you decide to do other things.

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